Alienation in network traffic

Illustration of Pawel Kucysnki

 

On normal days, outside the emergency, social networks and our smartphones are a superlfuous means of communication. While in this period they represent one of the few (if not the only) means by which not to remain alone. But one must always be cautious in using social media. The image of the artist Pawel Kuczysnki represents his alienation in the traffic, as if we were on a happy island but in reality we are only in the traffic.

In a time when it seems to be in the apocalypse, I put this wonderful song.

This beautiful song that represents the late 80s and early 90s … just because it was launched in that period, fits perfectly in this period in which most of us are locked up in the house because.

The song is about homeless, who do not even have a home…

Lyric

She calls out to the man in the street
“Sir, can you help me?
It’s gettin’ cold and there’s nowhere to sleep
Is there somewhere you can tell me?”
Oh, think twice
‘Cause there’s another day for you and me in paradise
Oh, think twice
‘Cause there’s another day for you
You and me in paradise
She calls out to the man in the street
He can see she’s been crying
She’s got blisters on the soles of her feet
She can’t walk, but she’s trying
Oh, think twice
It’s just another day for you and me in paradise
Oh, think twice
‘Cause it’s another day for you
You and me in paradise
Oh, Lord
Is there nothing more any one of us can do?
Oh, Lord
Na, na-na, na, na-na-now
You can tell from the lines on her face
You can see that she’s been there
Probably been moved on from every place
‘Cause she didn’t fit in there
Oh, think twice
‘Cause it’s another day for you and me in paradise
Oh, think twice
‘Cause it’s another day for you
You and me in paradise
Paradise
Think about it
Paradise
Just think about it
Just think about it

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The Queen’s Trooping the Colour birthday parade “will not go ahead in its traditional form” due to the ongoing coronavirus crisis. Buckingham Palace confirmed the news Friday. It’s the first time the event — originally scheduled for June 13 — hasn’t taken place like it usually does in 65 years. A statement obtained by ET… via […]

Sunrise On Mars — Perkins Designs

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SCARED — Susan Mehr

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24th march 1944: Ardeatine massacre

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The Ardeatine massacre, or Fosse Ardeatine massacre (Italian: Eccidio delle Fosse Ardeatine), was a mass killing carried out in Rome on 24 March 1944 by German occupation troops during the Second World War as a reprisal for the Via Rasella attack conducted on the previous day in central Rome against the SS Police Regiment Bozen.

Subsequently, the Ardeatine Caves site (Fosse Ardeatine) was declared a Memorial Cemetery and National Monument open daily to visitors. Every year, on the anniversary of the slaughter and in the presence of the senior officials of the Italian Republic, a solemn state commemoration is held at the monument in honour of the fallen. Each year, 335 names are called out, a simple roll call of the dead, to reinforce that 335 discrete individuals symbolise a collective entity.

☩ 17th March: Saint Patrick

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Today it is Saint Patrick who is patron of Ireland but is celebrated in many European countries around the world. Obviously due to the coronavirus this festival will not be celebrated in almost any country. But I want to remember at least a little the story of this saint with this post.

Saint Patrick  was a fifth-century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland. Known as the “Apostle of Ireland”, he is the primary patron saint of Ireland, the other patron saints being Brigit of Kildare and Columba. Patrick was never formally canonised. Nevertheless, he is venerated in the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran Churches, the Old Catholic Church, and in the Eastern Orthodox Church as equal-to-the-apostles and Enlightener of Ireland.

The dates of Patrick’s life cannot be fixed with certainty, but there is broad agreement that he was active as a missionary in Ireland during the fifth century. Nevertheless, as the most recent biography on Patrick shows, a late fourth-century date for the saint is not impossible. Early medieval tradition credits him with being the first bishop of Armagh and Primate of Ireland, and regards him as the founder of Christianity in Ireland, converting a society practising a form of Celtic polytheism. He has been generally so regarded ever since, despite evidence of some earlier Christian presence in Ireland.

According to the autobiographical Confessio of Patrick, when he was about sixteen, he was captured by Irish pirates from his home in Britain and taken as a slave to Ireland, looking after animals; he lived there for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After becoming a cleric, he returned to northern and western Ireland. In later life, he served as a bishop, but little is known about the places where he worked. By the seventh century, he had already come to be revered as the patron saint of Ireland.