14th March: Pi(π) Day

Pi Day vector background. Baked cherry pie with Pi Symbol and ribbon. Mathematical constant, irrational number, greek letter. Abstract digital illustration for March 14th. Poster creative template

Pi Day is an annual celebration of the mathematical constant π (pi). Pi Day is observed on March 14 (3/14 in the month/day format) since 3, 1, and 4 are the first three significant digits of π. In 2009, the United States House of Representatives supported the designation of Pi Day.

Pi Approximation Day is observed on July 22 (22/7 in the day/month format), since the fraction ​22⁄7 is a common approximation of π, which is accurate to two decimal places and dates from Archimedes.

Two Pi Day, also known as Tau Day for the mathematical constant Tau, is observed on June 28 (6/28 in the month/day format).

In 1988, the earliest known official or large-scale celebration of Pi Day was organized by Larry Shaw at the San Francisco Exploratorium, where Shaw worked as a physicist,[8] with staff and public marching around one of its circular spaces, then consuming fruit pies.[9] The Exploratorium continues to hold Pi Day celebrations.

On March 12, 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a non-binding resolution (111 H. Res. 224), recognizing March 14, 2009 as National Pi Day. For Pi Day 2010, Google presented a Google Doodle celebrating the holiday, with the word Google laid over images of circles and pi symbols;  and for the 30th anniversary in 2018, it was a Dominique Ansel pie with the circumference divided by its diameter.

The entire month of March 2014 (3/14) was observed by some as “Pi Month”. In the year 2015, March 14 was celebrated as “Super Pi Day”. It had special significance, as the date is written as 3/14/15 in month/day/year format. At 9:26:53, the date and time together represented the first 10 digits of π.

FANTASY ISLAND: remake of a cult series

The producer is Blumhouse Productions, which in recent years has given theaters a vast assortment of horror titles, some of which are valuable as “Insidious” and “Get out”, others in “splatter with panache” style for teenagers. Well, of such a large assortment of titles “Fantasy Island” is probably the worst.

The story sees five lucky prize contest winners land on a lush island. Waiting for them is the manager of a luxury resort, Mr. Roarke (Michael Peña), whose task will be to create a fantasy for each guest.

“Fantasy Island” takes a dated but successful idea and tries to adapt it to meet the tastes of the new generations. The intriguing premises and the suggestive location, however, do not find the right ingredients that make up the whole so it is a missed opportunity. Unnecessarily convoluted and full of illogical narrative overturns, “Fantasy Island” leaves us exhausted: the word “fantasy” is repeated by all the characters in a ridiculously obsessive way, it is not known why every now and then a man appears who is prowling in the jungle (Michael Rooker ), the characters are all annoying or whining and the ending is nothing short of messy, full of course changes

14th February: Valentin’s Day

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Valentine’s Day [Peanuts]

Every year on the 14th of February is celebrated the feast of lovers, in honor especially of the Saint Valentine of Terni.

The festival is very old and has gained worldwide importance only in recent centuries. But in recent decades it obviously had a commercial power to make it one of the most important anniversaries of the year.

The gesture (or the most common custom) is the gift of chocolates to the person we love.. But of course there are many other customs, such as a love note, the gift of a plush heart, or any object that symbolizes our affection. However, chocolates are the most popular gift.

The Anglo-Saxon countries have given in the common imagination the idea that the most common gesture was also a love note, especially because it was emphasized by children’s cartoons or films, but also by some writings of shakespeare..
Obviously the gesture of the chocolates is very intimate and there are many gifts more appropriate and relevant to our feeling ..

 

Short History

There is no evidence of any link between St. Valentine’s Day and the rites of the ancient Roman festival Lupercalia, despite many claims by many authors.[20][45][notes 1][46] The celebration of Saint Valentine did not have any romantic connotations until Chaucer’s poetry about “Valentines” in the 14th century.[26] Popular modern sources claim links to unspecified Greco-Roman February holidays alleged to be devoted to fertility and love to St. Valentine’s Day, but prior to Chaucer in the 14th century, there were no links between the saints named Valentinus and romantic love.[26]

In Ancient Rome, Lupercalia, observed February 13–15, was an archaic rite connected to fertility. Lupercalia was a festival local to the city of Rome. The more general Festival of Juno Februa, meaning “Juno the purifier” or “the chaste Juno”, was celebrated on February 13–14. Pope Gelasius I (492–496) abolished Lupercalia. Some researchers have theorized that Gelasius I replaced Lupercalia with the celebration of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary and claim a connection to the 14th century’s connotations of romantic love, but there is no historical indication that he ever intended such a thing.[46][notes 2][47] Also, the dates do not fit because at the time of Gelasius I, the feast was only celebrated in Jerusalem, and it was on February 14 only because Jerusalem placed the Nativity of Jesus (Christmas) on January 6.[notes 3] Although it was called “Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary”, it also dealt with the presentation of Jesus at the temple.[48] Jerusalem’s Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary on February 14 became the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple on February 2 as it was introduced to Rome and other places in the sixth century, after Gelasius I’s time.[48]

Alban Butler in his Lifes of the Principal Saints (1756–1759) claimed without proof that men and women in Lupercalia drew names from a jar to make couples, and that modern Valentine’s letters originated from this custom. In reality, this practice originated in the Middle Ages, with no link to Lupercalia, with men drawing the names of girls at random to couple with them. This custom was combated by priests, for example by Frances de Sales around 1600, apparently by replacing it with a religious custom of girls drawing the names of apostles from the altar. However, this religious custom is recorded as soon as the 13th century in the life of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, so it could have a different origin